Massage Therapy and Related Careers

Techniques used in massage therapies utilize aspects from several different career genres. A massage therapist, depending on the client, may serve roles similar to physical therapists, chiropractors, acupuncturists, holistic health practitioners and licensed practical nurses among other disciplines. Massage therapists often broaden their professional horizons by taking courses in the aforementioned fields or simply make lateral moves to other careers with message therapy as their base or point of reference.

Explore the career opportunities and possibilities you have! Massage Therapy is an excellent and expanding career field, and tremendous job growth is predicted for this career and many related careers. Learn more about each career listed below.

Massage Therapy and Related Career Information:

Programs to consider:

Lincoln Technical Institute
Locations:
  • Brockton, MA
  • Lincoln, RI
  • Somerville, MA
Programs available:
Arizona School of Massage Therapy
Locations:
  • Phoenix, AZ
  • Tempe, AZ
Programs available:
Northwestern College
Locations:
  • Chicago, IL
Programs available:
American Career College
Locations:
  • Anaheim, CA
  • Long Beach, CA
Programs available:
Medical Career Institute
Locations:
  • Richmond, VA
  • Newport News, VA
Programs available:
Vatterott College
Locations:
  • Saint Joseph, MO
Programs available:
Fortis Institute
Locations:
  • Towson, MD
  • Richmond, VA
  • Scranton, PA
Programs available:

Zero Balancing Massage

December 3, 2012
Zero Balancing Massage

Zero balancing massage combines the Western knowledge of anatomy with the Eastern understanding of body energy. Dr. Fritz Smith developed the theory of zero balancing only a few years ago: that the unobstructed flow of energy through the bones and joints of the body provides a state of balance, or health, for each individual. Every person is both a physical body and a spiritual body, as a whole. Dr. Smith felt the Asian understanding of life energy flowing throughout the body through specific channels or meridians was correct.

Thai Massage

December 3, 2012
Thai Massage

Thai massage originated over 2500 years ago and is attributed the personal physician of the Buddha for its development. A combination of Indian, Chinese, and Tibetan medicine, the methods of this therapeutic massage were preserved by the Buddhist monks as traditional Thai healing. Thai massage makes use of the channels or meridians that ancient Asian healers charted in fixed positions in each person and which carry the life force of energy throughout the body. These are the same meridians and corresponding pressure points used by acupuncturists today.

Swedish Massage

December 3, 2012
Swedish Massage
A Swedish massage is the most common type of massage treatment in America today. Begun in the 1700s, its intent was to increase blood flow and to relax muscles for patients with arthritis and other painful diseases. The strong movements of the Swedish massage glide from the toes toward the heart and also from the head toward the heart. Because muscles tense when the body senses danger and stress, Swedish massage loosens muscles, lowering blood pressure and heart rate.

Shiatsu Massage

December 3, 2012
Shiatsu Massage

Deriving its history from the medical philosophy and practices of the Orient begun several thousand years ago, Shiatsu massage is based on the charted positions of the channels or meridians through which energy flows throughout each person. These are the same meridians utilized by acupuncturists and acupressure therapists. Shiatsu massage is a form of acupressure which was modified to include more current knowledge of anatomy and physiology.

Reflexology Therapy

December 3, 2012
Reflexology Therapy

Reflexology is both an art and a therapy, which uses specific massage techniques of the feet which then produce physical reactions in targeted areas of the body. Reflex areas in the feet uniquely correspond to regions, glands, and organs of the body, as detailed in reflexology charts. Reflexology has its roots in both ancient Egypt and China but was developed in the Western world by two Americans in the early 1900s.

Qi Gong Massage

December 3, 2012
Qi Gong Massage

Qi Gong massage has its roots in the ancient philosophy and medicine of China. The Chinese believe the body is made up of two elements: the inner body of energy called the Qi (or the Yin) and the outer physical body (call the Yang). The Qi body is the basis of the physical (Yang) body. The Qi (Yin) and the Yang should always be in balance for optimum health and longevity. If the Qi is weakened, there will be an imbalance in the body and a corresponding negative physical or emotionalchange in the outward body.

Myofascial Massage Therapy

December 3, 2012
Myofascial Massage Therapy

Myofascial release massage targets the connective tissue, called the fascia, which surround muscles. These bands of fibrous tissue establish interconnections of the muscles with other parts of the body, like tendons, joints, bones, blood supply, and organs. Due to injury or illness, these fascial tissues can become dense, tight and sore. Therapists perform myofascial release massage to loosen these tissues, increase blood supply, and stretch the fascial tissues which will increase motion and lessen discomfort.

Healing Touch Massage

December 3, 2012
Healing Touch Massage
Often practiced by registered nurses, healing touch employs gentle contact to expedite wound healing and encouraging relaxation. Healing Touch is also employed to prevent illness. 

Want to learn more? Discover other types of Massage Therapy by clicking on a link below.

Deep Tissue Massage

December 3, 2012
Deep Tissue Massage

Deep tissue massage is an advanced form of Swedish massage, using the same basic strokes, but with heavier pressure applied slowly and transversely across the deep layers of muscle tissues. In this type of massage, the muscles are slowly warmed with regular massage before heavier pressure is begun for deep muscle work, delivering release of tension in the deeper tissues. Deep tissue massage is not a relaxation massage and is often aimed for treatment of muscle injuries, including tendons and ligaments.

Aromatherapy

December 3, 2012
Aromatherapy

Scent is one of our most utilized and sustaining senses. Aromatherapy taps into this sense by using fragrant essential oils to heal and sooth, reducing stress and increasing energy. It is both an art and a science, historically used for medicinal purposes and now a professional science. Through the correct blending of aromatic and therapeutic oils, a therapist can affect an individual’s physical, emotional, and spiritual healing.

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